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  • br side effects After internalization

    2022-05-23

    
    side effects. 3) After internalization of Apt-HSA/CCM NP to tumor cells, as it was observed in release studies, the release of drug has increased in pH 5 and medium containing GSH 10 mM.
    4. Conclusion
    A new apt-targeted HSA NPs loaded with CCM for active targeting of HER2 overexpressing breast cancer SU5416 was successfully designed and characterized. Small size, narrow size distribution, long term stability, sustained drug release behavior and higher cytotoxicity of apt-targeted CCM-loaded NPs in comparison with free drug and untargeted formulation demonstrate the significant capabilities of this new drug platform. The result of this study shows that toxicity of HSA/CCM NPs is close to free CCM, while in some cases the toxicity effect of free CCM is more than HSA/CCM NPs, but it was not significant. Despite the fact that encapsulation of CCM in HSA nanoparticle increases solu-bility and stability, there is difficulty in cell internalization. Apt-
    Fig. 6. In vitro cytotoxicity results of free CCM, untargeted HSA/CCM NPs and targeted Apt-HSA/CCM NPs at different times of (A) 24 h (B) 48 h and (C) 72 h in MCF-7 cells. Data are plotted as mean ± SD of three experiments. No significant difference was seen in cell viability among cells treated with free CCM, HSA/CCM NPs and Apt-HSA/CCM NPs. Cell viability slightly increased in cells treated with Apt-HSA/CCM NPs at 70 μM after 72 h (*p b 0.05) compared to cells treated with curcumin.
    targeted nanoparticles had more cytotoxic effect than non-targeted nanoparticles and free CCM in SK-BR3 (HER2+) cells (p b 0.05). How-ever, cytotoxicity differences were not observed in (HER2−) cells be-tween targeted and non-targeted nanoparticles (p N 0.05); suggesting that the conjugation of Apt in HSA NPs formulation significantly has im-proved cytotoxicity of CCM in HER2+ cells. Accordingly, it can be pro-posed that HER2-conjugated drug-loaded HSA NPs possess higher 
    anticancer therapeutic efficacy for HER2 positive breast cancer cells and probably could reduce the side effects of the therapies.
    Acknowledgment
    This research was financially supported by Iran National Science Foundation (INSF) (Grant No. 94018445) and Tarbiat Modares Univer-sity (TMU).
    References
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    [17] T. Saleh, T. Soudi, S.A. Shojaosadati, Redox responsive curcumin-loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles: preparation, characterization and in vitro evaluation, Int. J. Biol. Macromol. 114 (2018) 759–766.
    [26] H. Mohammad-Beigi, S.A. Shojaosadati, D. Morshedi, A. Arpanaei, A.T. Marvian, Preparation and in vitro characterization of gallic acid-loaded human serum albu-min nanoparticles, J. Nanopart. Res. 17 (4) (2015) 167. [27] M. Esfandyari-Manesh, A. Mohammadi, F. Atyabi, S.M. Nabavi, S.M. Ebrahimi, E. Shahmoradi, B.S. Varnamkhasti, M.H. Ghahremani, R. Dinarvand, Specific targeting
    Contents lists available at ScienceDirect
    Process Biochemistry
    journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/procbio
    Arginyl-glycyl-aspartic acid (RGD) containing nanostructured lipid carrier T co-loaded with doxorubicin and sildenafil citrate enhanced anti-cancer effects and overcomes drug resistance
    Hamed Hajipoura, Marjan Ghorbanib, Houman Kahrobac,d, Farideh Mahmoodzadehe, Reza Zolfaghari Emamehf, Ramezan Ali Taheri a, a Nanobiotechnology Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran b Stem Cell Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran c Molecular Medicine Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran d Department of Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Advanced Medical Sciences, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran e Halal Research Center of IRI, FDA, Tehran, Iran f Department of Energy and Environmental Biotechnology, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (NIGEB), 14965/161, Tehran, Iran